Aspen Leaf


ASPENTREE COUNSELING
& HYPNOTHERAPY

TRANSPERSONAL * INSIGHT * HYPNOSIS * CREATIVE EXPRESSION
A HOLISTIC MENTAL HEALTHCARE PRACTICE

 

HOME PAGE



PSYCHOTHERAPY

& COUNSELING

 

FAQ

About Me

About My Practice

Forms

 



HYPNOTHERAPY

 

FAQ

Smoking Cessation

Research

NHG Ethics

History of Hypnosis

Articles

 



ART THERAPY

 

Art-As-Therapy and
Art Psychotherapy

 


 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

 

Counseling Services

Behavioral Specialist

Behavior Technician Svcs

 


 

RESPITE SERVICES


Special Needs Specialist

 


 

PRIVATE IN-HOME NURSING CARE

 

Dementia, Mental Health, Elder Care,
Special Needs Specialist

 


 

CRISIS PAGE & INFORMATION

(Suicide, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, Post Traumatic Stress, etc.)

 

Click Here for Crisis Page

 


TUTORING

Tutoring K thru 12,

College and Grad School.

 



THERAPY DOG ON SITE

 

Animal Assisted Therapy

 


 

WEDDINGS AND SUNDRY

 

Rev. Fr. Kipp

 


 

LINKS

 

Link Page


 

REGARDING

WEATHER CANCELLATIONS:

For the safety of clients, appointments will be cancelled on foul weather days that endanger transportation. As a rule, if the public schools are closed, then so is Aspentree Counseling & Hypnotherapy. The decision to close due to safety concerns is ultimately under the discretion of AC&H.



The voyage of discovery is not

 in seeking new landscapes

but in having new eyes.

-Marcel Proust

 


THERAPY DOG ON SITE



Merlin is a Husky-Chow-Golden Retriever mix, and loves his job here at the office. He is a people-person, with over nine years experience as my colleague, both in-office and in-home interventions. Merlin brings to the job a dogs' natural talent for positive regard, soothing, relaxation, helping to lift spirits and facilitate recovery in this way for a variety of people with any number of physical, emotional, and/or cognitive challenges.
(
Please discuss bringing your own pet to sessions ahead of time.
Appointment times are available to schedule with or without animal-assisted-therapy present.)

 

 

AN ANCIENT PROFESSION

Photo: A group of objects from Llys Awel, near Pen-y-Corddyn hillfort. Altogether 535 Roman coins were found dating from the late 1st century to the end of the 4th century, two small bronze seated dogs, another dog of greyhound type, a statuette of Mercury, three votive plaques (two decorated with dogs) and a twisted wire bracelet. The role of the dog in both the Celtic and Classical world appears to be concerned mainly with healing. The presence of the dogs in this assemblage would appear to indicate a healing shrine in the vicinity or possibly a curative spring. The coins and objects would have been offered to the gods by those seeking a cure. Such a shrine may have had pre-Roman origins and was certainly patronised until the 390s.

 

A group of objects from Llys Awel, near Pen-y-Corddyn hillfort. Altogether 535 Roman coins were found dating from the late 1st century to the end of the 4th century, two small bronze seated dogs, another dog of greyhound type, a statuette of Mercury, three votive plaques (two decorated with dogs) and a twisted wire bracelet. The role of the dog in both the Celtic and Classical world appears to be concerned mainly with healing. The presence of the dogs in this assemblage would appear to indicate a healing shrine in the vicinity or possibly a curative spring. The coins and objects would have been offered to the gods by those seeking a cure. Such a shrine may have had pre-Roman origins and was certainly patronized until the 390s. (Source: http://www.coflein.gov.uk/en/site/303515/collection/PEN-Y-CORDDYN-MAWR,+ABERGELE/)


Animals, especially dogs, have been assisting humans at least since the beginning of recorded history. They have helped us at work, provided us with companionship and lifted our spirits. The caption above suggests that they played a roll in the healing process for ancient cultures. It has been only in the last century that animals were officially recognized for their therapeutic abilities.
Therapy animals are used in a variety of healthcare and educational situations. This includes nursing facility visits, physical therapy and rehab, special needs education, regular education, residential school environments, and a variety of mental health settings.

"Health studies have shown how having a well-loved pet can lower a person's blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart disease, but what can they do for long-term patients?

  • The soft touch of an animal can bring joy to a person who's lost a beloved pet. People in long-term care facilities have often gone a long time without a gentle touch.
  • Animals are non-judgmental, forgiving of mistakes and offer unconditional love where a human being may not.
  • Animals offer entertainment, a willing ear, and tend to increase social interaction.
  • A patient who is in pain or can not speak will not feel pressured to interact with an animal.
  • Animals accept the patient for what he or she is, and will not stare or ask awkward questions regarding any disabilities.
  • Having an animal present can often focus a patient on itself rather than the patient's current infirmity.
  • Pets help people to relax, thus lowering blood pressure. (http://dogs.about.com/cs/pettherapy/a/aa032303a.htm)"


Merlin brings to the job a dogs' natural talent for positive regard, soothing, relaxation, helping to lift spirits and facilitate recovery in this way for a variety of people with any number of physical, emotional, and/or cognitive challenges.

 

 

 

 scales   PRIVACY POLICY/LEGAL INFO book